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it be guided by science and by -- [applause] by accurate public policy analysis, by studies that show things like what are the rewards that are reaped from investment in public funding of contraception or in having everyone be insured as a society and what as a society do we gain from that, what is the consequences if we don't? it's been very disappointing to see the ways in which over the last few years science has really been pushed out of so much of our legislative process. there are bills that have been enacted across the country requiring medical providers to give statements to women who are coming for services, frequently abortion services, that are based on untrue science. and that's a scary moment regardless of how you feel about abortion and what your personal or legal beliefs are about that. to require medical professionals to mislead their patients is not where we should be as a country, and i think those type of scientific facts and accurate public policy analyses should be given much more credence in our political and government process than our ideology. [applause] >> i think i
that have not been here before, is a science and technology not for profit policy think tank if you will win the washington, d.c. area that focuses on how science and technology affect the national security. for quite some time we have studied issues in and around what people callasymmetric threats and most importantly, terrorism. this past year professor alexander and i released our second volume on al qaeda about 11 years after the first volume on al qaeda right before 9/11, and we would like to call your attention to it. there are copies available year and of course available on the web at amazon always good things and i want to highlight it today because it is more of a gift we are going to give to our panel members for taking the time of their busy schedules to the very least i can promise you a good sleep if you read it. [laughter] the second look at the potomac institute has been involved in over this past year is an effort with the bechtel corporation to look at the cyber issue, in particular the seibu doctrine. that volume edited by tim and i is in the publication of you have on you
at elon college majoring in international studies with all sorts of minors, political science, and she has worked with refugees and her region. she is the president of halal on her campus and the millennial values fellow so we are pleased that she is back. last but not least, mohammad usman is a senior at depauw university majoring in urban policy and conflict studies with a minor in religious studies. he was a part of the national bioethics bowl, the winning team in the last year so congratulations on that. and before attending depauw was a special assistant in advocate for acts of civil legal justice at the university of new york school of law. so welcome to all of them. i would like to hear from all of you, and last night when we heard governor romney talk about states as the laboratory of democracy so while that may have been a republican democrat comment it got me thinking about our mayor and the work that they do in their communities and i'm going to hand the floor over to them. if you could both talk a little bit about how you see the future of american politics. >> thank you for ha
of systems all of which are so important to the asia-pacific region. and we'll continue all of our science and technology investments across the board. the third reason why we can carry out the rebalance is that we're shifting our posture forward and into the asia-pacific region; that is, not what we have, but where we put it is also changing. by 2020 we will have shifted 60% of our naval assets to the pacific. that's an historic change for the be united states navy. the marine corps will have up to 2500 marines on rotation in australia, we will have four la toral combat ships stationed forward in singapore, i was just aboard both in san diego last week, and we'll proceed fully to build out our military presence on guam and surrounding areas, which is an important strategic hub for the western pacific. we will begin to rotate b-1 bombers into the region augmenting the b-52 bombers already on continuous rotation. we've already deployed f-22s to kadima air force base in japan, and we will deploy the f-35 joint strike fighter to the region. differently, we're sending our newest assets to the
years from 2007-2010 he served as chairman of the house committee on science and technology. bard is working with the brookings institution to improve public sector leadership as part of our new initiative on improving leadership and management. bill kristol is the editor of "the weekly standard," which he cofounded in 1995. prior to starting that he led the project for the republican future. he also served as chief of staff to vice president quayle and secretary of education bill bennett. he also served as foreign policy adviser to senator john mccain. i'm sure all of you see built regularly on "fox news sunday" and the fox news channel. i actually met bill in 1981 when he was a very young, assistant professor at the university of pennsylvania. it's been great to see all the things he has accomplished since that time. so the questions i'd like to pose for each of you come and i'll start with governor huntsman, what does the 2012 election reveal about the respected leadership styles of obama and romney? >> probably not much at this point. >> well, this panel is over. [laughter] >>
was held up the wilson center in june on science and technology and innovation. the symposia, which the institute co-chairs foot china's state council, not only promote dialogue among the stakeholders but allow the participants to develop personal connections. the institute also recently released an initial report on u.s.-china security perceptions, and other big project we are working on with leading research institutions in the u.s. and beijing. just last month we published the u.s. cooperation and clean energy and the review of the difficulties both countries face in developing solar, wind and other alternative energy industries and the potential room for cooperation. last november, finally, henry participated in another one of our national conversations entitled afghanistan is there a regional and gamecocks the story on this is interesting. he resisted when he learned we get organized a brilliant panel of scholars and reporters to comment on his remarks to the and we hadn't cleared the names with him. he didn't know all the people, and he was not happy. but he gave brief remarks
the most government funded research to push the boundaries of science and technology so our best innovators and the entrepreneurs could pluck them and start these companies. if you think about that is a formula for success, and education we now -- well, roughly 30% of high school students drop out of high school. we used to lead the world in college graduates coming out of high school. we no longer do that. on infrastructure, according to the american society of civil engineers we are now $2 trillion in deficit in terms of infrastructure. immigration we have a policy to get a great education and then get the hell out of our country. we are fighting on the simplest h-1b issues that are so vital for our future strength. fourth, the rules for incentivizing risk-taking and preventing recklessness. i don't think that we have in any way remedied that the way we want and on the government funded research if it looks like an ekg heading for a heart attack. i don't know if they are relative to what. all i know is in the things that have historically made us great, on each one of those i see us not g
finance the transcontinental railroad. let's start the national academy of sciences. let's start the land grant colleges because we want to give the gateway if they are giving opportunity we are all going to be better off. that doesn't restrict people's freedom, that enhances it. so what i have tried to do as president is to apply the same principles. >> that's president obama from the debate this week on the role of government. now let's listen to his challenger, mitt romney, with his answer to that question. >> first, life and liberty. we have a responsibility to protect the life and liberty of our people and that means military second to none. i do not believe in cutting the military. i believe in maintaining the strength of america's military. second, in the line that says we are in doubt by our creator with rights i believe we must maintain our commitment to religious tolerance and freedom in this country. that statement also says that we are endowed by our creator with a right to pursue happiness as we choose. i interpret that as one, making sure those are less fortunate and can't c
and every like to possessors of political science speculating in the abstract about the nature of international politics. you may wonder why it was because of fact the only thing worth talking about was at that point whether we could establish enough confidence between the two of us to risky adventure that opening to china representative for both sides shown that point of view, from a domestic, political point of view. and even though the subject of president nixon to china, was the reason why i came, neither side mentioned it until about 12 hours before. i mention not only to say i believe it should be followed to get your object it straight before you start haggling about details. we had no choice. now every generation and then was a great reform and i cannot think of any other country where you could definitely say that the evolution that we have seen in the last 30 years, depending on the vision of one man, as in the case of no other chinese who had the vision and the courage to move china into the imaginative system and to engage the reform and instituting a market system.
there's history, social studies, science and not part -- >> don't forget band and trauma. >> for their informed citizens what can our organization do more about that? islamic school boards often times dictate the curriculums and what kind of history is being taught and if the teaching african american history starting with 1865 and abraham lincoln on through and that's all you get about the black folks and the latino history starts with i don't know, 2006. that is how some of these issues are being framed. you get these type of - out there and you're wondering why your kids are not worried about this will involve or understand the history and why the need to be involved. it wasn't until the senator was in the united states senate he said before it was the first republican reconstruction and texas. the way the republicans took over the state of texas the first ran for the state board of education. democrats totally overlooked it. what they recognized was this was pure politics. they looked at the election and they saw how many it took to win the seats in the previous elect
to actually do something that will be good for patients and good for science going forward so this is the one thing that didn't make it. the other little thick that didn't make it is now the safe dosage act, passed in the last minute, by the senate, and that's awaiting the president's signature, but one of the things that's necessary in terms of the resources is that this has to be a global enterprise. one of the things that is happening globally is the leading pharmaceutical companies in the united states, in europe, in japan have banded together to work with interpol to ensure they have enough resources to go after the bad guys around the world, and we've just started that. i think we're going to kick that off here next month. we've been discussing this with interpol, and we think we have a good program to help country's specific enforcement agencies with the global respective of interpol. yes, it costs money. it is money well spent, but more importantly, it gets us the heart of the trust that patients have to have in our medicines. >> ralph, i know as we've worked on the partnership and bu
of the house, science, space, and technology committee as well as a confer rei on -- conferee on the faa committee, i realize making the skies safer, less congested, and cleaner requires substantial investments. we must invest in the future, but we have to invest wisely. i'm concerned with the department of transportation, inspector general's april 2012 # report that the en route implementation schedule slipped by four years, and over budgeted by $330 million. in addition, i understand that although progress is being made, the agency has had difficulties in developing performance metrics for next generation goals. i want to thank you chairman petri and ranking member costillo, for holding the hearing, and i look forward to the testimony of the witnesses today because i believe we have to implement the next generation technology. thank you, and i yield back. >> thank you, and now we turn to the first panel, and i'd like to welcome the honorable john portcari, the u.s. secretary of the department of transportation, the acting administrator of the faa. welcome to both of you, and our regula
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12